‘Hamilton’ World Domination Continues With Disney Plus Movie

Forrest Hartman

Hamilton uses what some might call colorblind casting, but it goes beyond colorblind. The show is intentionally diverse, meaning white historical figures are often portrayed by minority actors as a point of course. This is particularly poignant in the wake of the George Floyd protests. One might be able to overlook the fact that a Black man is playing Thomas Jefferson, were it not for that fact that Jefferson ran a plantation and owned slaves. That juxtaposition is jolting.

Award-Winning Writer Portrays a Moving Family Saga in ‘Someone to Watch Over’

William Schreiber

William Schreiber earned the 2019 Rising Star Award from the Women’s Fiction Writers Association for his novel, Someone to Watch Over. The book was adapted from his original screenplay, which has won or been nominated for many competition awards, including the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ prestigious Nicholl Fellowship in Screenwriting, as well as numerous Best Screenplay awards at film festivals throughout the country.

The Latest Legal Challenge to Removing Confederate Statues in Virginia

Allison Anna Tait

To many locals, especially Black Richmond residents, the sculptures have always been colossal reminders of the South’s history of enslavement and the violence wrought on Black lives. The governor and city leaders now seemingly agree, saying that monuments glorifying the region’s white supremacist history should not be displayed on public land. Nevertheless, Richmond’s Lee statue still has its defenders.

New Novel Navigates a Grim Personal Journey and Unraveling World

Eric Michael Bovim

My goal was to try not to think. When I was away, I was a good enough father through texts. I would wait to hit send once the wheels left the tarmac. I don’t know why I would procrastinate until a single column of cell signal remained. By the end of the year, though, I was taking seven pills a day just to freeze the frame of my decline. Grief can bleed you into white nothing. Colin soon became symptomatic.

‘7500’ Is a Suspenseful, Must-Watch Thriller

Forrest Hartman

Vollrath makes the most of the confined setting -- something that could hurt a weaker filmmaker. In some respects, 7500 must have been easy to produce. A single location, small cast, and minimal set dressing all speed the shooting process, but these things come with restraints. When all the action is set in an airplane cockpit, there are no astonishing backdrops or special effects to use as a crutch. The weight of the storytelling is relegated to the script and its handful of actors.

Dungeons & Dragons and Us: The Rise of Geek Culture

Adam Gravano

This process isn't just confined to movies, though. Interestingly, it has extended to that apex of nerdy pastimes, the tabletop roleplaying game, Dungeons & Dragons. Many are familiar with the game, either from garish mischaracterizations in the press or from the pulpit or from their own personal practice. Lately, though, the game isn't being characterized as a means of communing with demons or the driving factor of suicides; it's getting top billing as a pastime of characters in Stranger Things and The Big Bang Theory.

Art Collective DOSSHAUS Continues the Legacy of Pop Art

The Editors

DOSSHAUS is an art collective founded in 2011 and the current nom de guerre of David Connelly. Created in response to a society saturated with social-media-generated images in which reality itself seems all the more relative, DOSSAHAUS uses recycled cardboard, paper, and acrylic to create its own highly idealized universe. This cardboard world is at once separate from and a product of modern culture. DOSSHAUS have taken part in more than 20 group art exhibitions in Los Angeles, New York and Miami.

Why Controversy Has Often Loomed Large in the History of the U.S. Census

Angelo Franco

Experts were quick to criticize this strategy, noting that the drawing of districts based on voting-age citizens would be advantageous to Republicans and non-Hispanic whites. This is a conclusion that the GOP’s own master strategist Thomas Hofeller arrived at during his 2015 study of gerrymandering which, in a bonkers turn of events, we only know about because his estranged daughter found thumb drives with her father’s work after he died and provided them to Common Cause, which challenged he citizenship question in federal court citing Hofeller’s own study.

‘Artemis Fowl’ Is a Streaming Mess

Forrest Hartman

Viewers are legitimately transported to a land where fairies and goblins are real, and it’s all very dazzling and Harry Potter-like. Artemis Fowl would seem, then, to be a perfect film for fans of that series. Alas, the Harry Potter features are painstakingly mapped out so viewers understand the rules of the magical world they enter. This is not the case with Artemis Fowl, which teases viewers without elaborating and leads to a long string of questions that are never adequately answered.

Photographer Stephen Wilkes Captures Magical Moments of Earth and Sky

The Editors

For more than three decades, Stephen Wilkes has established himself as one of the world’s most acclaimed landscape photographers. Living and working in Westport, Connecticut, Wilkes has traveled the world capturing the beauty of land and cityscapes, while also documenting the destruction of events like Hurricane Katrina and climate change. In April 2020, Wilkes’s moving photographs of essential workers on the frontlines of the COVID-19 crisis in Westport were the subject of the Vanity Fair feature.

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